astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

Thorn Treehopper

(Umbonia crassicornis)

is a treehopper of the order (hemiptera). they can be found from northern South America all the way up to Florida. they are mostly seen on fruit trees as they feed on them. they are small insects growing up to .39 in length. they are also unique in that they have a large horn on their back (thus their name) this horn is used to discourage predators from attempting to eating the animal as they look like a thorn. adults are a greenish yellow color with red lines and brown markings on the animal.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Arthropoda-Hexapoda-Insecta-Hemiptera-Membracidae

ichthyologist

ichthyologist:

Leaf-cutter Ant Society

Next to humans, leafcutter ants form the largest and most complex animal societies on Earth. In a few years, the central mound of their underground nests can grow to more than 30 metres (98 ft) across, with smaller, radiating mounds extending out to a radius of 80 metres (260 ft), taking up 30 to 600 square metres (320 to 6,500 sq ft) and containing eight million individuals.

Info: Ross 2002, pp. 11–13. Pictures: ggalice on Flickr, Bandwagonman at en.wikipedia

rhamphotheca
rhamphotheca:

Hornet Claw
Fancy a handshake with a hornet? This spiky appendage is the foot of an unidentified hornet found in Decatur, Ga. Magnified 87 times, this image is of the insect’s “pretarsus,” or the tip of one of its six legs. The sucker-like pad in the middle of the hornet’s claw is the arolium, and the hair-like projections all over the leg are called setae. This image was taken with a scanning electron microscope in 2007.
(via: Live Science)       (image: CDC/ Janice Haney Carr)

rhamphotheca:

Hornet Claw

Fancy a handshake with a hornet? This spiky appendage is the foot of an unidentified hornet found in Decatur, Ga. Magnified 87 times, this image is of the insect’s “pretarsus,” or the tip of one of its six legs. The sucker-like pad in the middle of the hornet’s claw is the arolium, and the hair-like projections all over the leg are called setae. This image was taken with a scanning electron microscope in 2007.

(via: Live Science)       (image: CDC/ Janice Haney Carr)

rhamphotheca

rhamphotheca:

ofthewoodland:  Bird Dropping Mimicry

A variety of creatures have been selected for the expression of colors that allow them to blend in more appropriately or appear distasteful compared to another prey item. The Pied Mossy Frog, Wilson’s Wood Nymph moth, and a Bolas spider are wonderful examples of this interesting aid to survival, for they seem to appear as bird droppings. These creatures have been known as “bird dropping mimics”. The last spider is unidentified but is still a wonderful display of camouflage. 

scientificillustration

artistbynecessity-sketchbook:

At last! My mammoth drawing’s done after a back-breaking 7+ hours in 2 days (I took regular bathroom and lunch breaks though). It was an exercise on scale -  we were given a small photocopy of an insect, and then, we had to blow the image up.

I was beaming at myself even though at the time I finished it, no one was there to see me at my best. I feel proud. I hope you will appreciate this as much as I do. 

micro-scopic
micro-scopic:

Culex (Mosquito) Antennae
The male mosquito has large bushy antennae, which he uses to listen for the buzz of a potential mate. He responds only to the humming frequency given by a female of the same species and will fly in the direction of the sound to mate with her. Male mosquitoes do not bite, but feed on plant juices and flower nectar. Only female mosquitoes bite animals and require a blood meal.

micro-scopic:

Culex (Mosquito) Antennae

The male mosquito has large bushy antennae, which he uses to listen for the buzz of a potential mate. He responds only to the humming frequency given by a female of the same species and will fly in the direction of the sound to mate with her. Male mosquitoes do not bite, but feed on plant juices and flower nectar. Only female mosquitoes bite animals and require a blood meal.

image

Dryococelus australis, more affectionately known as the tree lobster, was thought to be extinct by 1930. In 2001, a small population was discovered living on a small volcanic stack in the Pacific Ocean known as Ball’s Pyramid.

They can be roughly 6 inches long by the time they reach adulthood. What charmed me most about these guys is that the males and females tend to form a bond, a relationship unusual for insects. The male almost acts as a shadow for his female, following her around and engaging in the activities she does.

More Here.