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2 posts tagged feathers

10th July, 2012

An untitled artistic photo by Santosh Shanmuga, undergraduate student, Laboratory of Receptor Biology, Duke University. The photo shows a close-up view of the primary feathers of a scarlet macaw (Ara macao). The beautiful iridescent quality of the colors is visible, as well as the intricate veins.

An untitled artistic photo by Santosh Shanmuga, undergraduate student, Laboratory of Receptor Biology, Duke University.

The photo shows a close-up view of the primary feathers of a scarlet macaw (Ara macao). The beautiful iridescent quality of the colors is visible, as well as the intricate veins.

7th April, 2012

wildlifecollective:

Dinosaur Feathers Discovered in Canadian AmberToday a group of paleontologists announced the results of an extensive study of several well-preserved dinosaur feathers encased in amber. Their work, which included samples from many stages in the evolution of feathers, bolstered the findings of other scientists who’ve suggested that dinosaurs (winged and otherwise) had multicolored and transparent feathers of the sort you might see on birds today. The researchers also presented evidence, based on the feathers’ pigmentation and structures, that today’s bird feathers could have evolved from dinosaur feathers.Read More | Photos © Science/AAAS
wildlifecollective:

Dinosaur Feathers Discovered in Canadian AmberToday a group of paleontologists announced the results of an extensive study of several well-preserved dinosaur feathers encased in amber. Their work, which included samples from many stages in the evolution of feathers, bolstered the findings of other scientists who’ve suggested that dinosaurs (winged and otherwise) had multicolored and transparent feathers of the sort you might see on birds today. The researchers also presented evidence, based on the feathers’ pigmentation and structures, that today’s bird feathers could have evolved from dinosaur feathers.Read More | Photos © Science/AAAS
wildlifecollective:

Dinosaur Feathers Discovered in Canadian AmberToday a group of paleontologists announced the results of an extensive study of several well-preserved dinosaur feathers encased in amber. Their work, which included samples from many stages in the evolution of feathers, bolstered the findings of other scientists who’ve suggested that dinosaurs (winged and otherwise) had multicolored and transparent feathers of the sort you might see on birds today. The researchers also presented evidence, based on the feathers’ pigmentation and structures, that today’s bird feathers could have evolved from dinosaur feathers.Read More | Photos © Science/AAAS
wildlifecollective:

Dinosaur Feathers Discovered in Canadian AmberToday a group of paleontologists announced the results of an extensive study of several well-preserved dinosaur feathers encased in amber. Their work, which included samples from many stages in the evolution of feathers, bolstered the findings of other scientists who’ve suggested that dinosaurs (winged and otherwise) had multicolored and transparent feathers of the sort you might see on birds today. The researchers also presented evidence, based on the feathers’ pigmentation and structures, that today’s bird feathers could have evolved from dinosaur feathers.Read More | Photos © Science/AAAS
wildlifecollective:

Dinosaur Feathers Discovered in Canadian AmberToday a group of paleontologists announced the results of an extensive study of several well-preserved dinosaur feathers encased in amber. Their work, which included samples from many stages in the evolution of feathers, bolstered the findings of other scientists who’ve suggested that dinosaurs (winged and otherwise) had multicolored and transparent feathers of the sort you might see on birds today. The researchers also presented evidence, based on the feathers’ pigmentation and structures, that today’s bird feathers could have evolved from dinosaur feathers.Read More | Photos © Science/AAAS
wildlifecollective:

Dinosaur Feathers Discovered in Canadian AmberToday a group of paleontologists announced the results of an extensive study of several well-preserved dinosaur feathers encased in amber. Their work, which included samples from many stages in the evolution of feathers, bolstered the findings of other scientists who’ve suggested that dinosaurs (winged and otherwise) had multicolored and transparent feathers of the sort you might see on birds today. The researchers also presented evidence, based on the feathers’ pigmentation and structures, that today’s bird feathers could have evolved from dinosaur feathers.Read More | Photos © Science/AAAS
wildlifecollective:

Dinosaur Feathers Discovered in Canadian AmberToday a group of paleontologists announced the results of an extensive study of several well-preserved dinosaur feathers encased in amber. Their work, which included samples from many stages in the evolution of feathers, bolstered the findings of other scientists who’ve suggested that dinosaurs (winged and otherwise) had multicolored and transparent feathers of the sort you might see on birds today. The researchers also presented evidence, based on the feathers’ pigmentation and structures, that today’s bird feathers could have evolved from dinosaur feathers.Read More | Photos © Science/AAAS

wildlifecollective:

Dinosaur Feathers Discovered in Canadian Amber

Today a group of paleontologists announced the results of an extensive study of several well-preserved dinosaur feathers encased in amber. Their work, which included samples from many stages in the evolution of feathers, bolstered the findings of other scientists who’ve suggested that dinosaurs (winged and otherwise) had multicolored and transparent feathers of the sort you might see on birds today. The researchers also presented evidence, based on the feathers’ pigmentation and structures, that today’s bird feathers could have evolved from dinosaur feathers.

Read More | Photos © Science/AAAS

(via Wildlife Collective)