26th May, 2013

This plate, from a later book by Ernst Haeckel, shows a selection of vertebrate embryos from fish to human at three development stages. It was meant to illustrate the similarity between human and animal embryos. Haeckel explained that this is more complete at early stages and retained longer between more closely-related groups.
Haeckel’s scientific opponents accused him of drawing inaccurately to support his theories, and religious enemies taunted him with charges of forgery. His pictures were nevertheless very widely used in textbooks in the 20th century.

This plate, from a later book by Ernst Haeckel, shows a selection of vertebrate embryos from fish to human at three development stages. It was meant to illustrate the similarity between human and animal embryos. Haeckel explained that this is more complete at early stages and retained longer between more closely-related groups.

Haeckel’s scientific opponents accused him of drawing inaccurately to support his theories, and religious enemies taunted him with charges of forgery. His pictures were nevertheless very widely used in textbooks in the 20th century.

Notes

  1. castro20 reblogged this from blamoscience
  2. jadore-les-frites reblogged this from blamoscience
  3. derkreisel reblogged this from blamoscience
  4. wolffeeder reblogged this from blamoscience
  5. jlk718 reblogged this from blamoscience
  6. obyonetaopy reblogged this from blamoscience and added:
    Cette planche de dessin, montre que dans les tous premiers stages du developpement d’un embryon, qu’il soit poisson,...
  7. danthemancallahan92 reblogged this from blamoscience
  8. satchel-of-chaos reblogged this from blamoscience
  9. underthespottedlights reblogged this from blamoscience
  10. joypierre reblogged this from blamoscience
  11. vangogh3 reblogged this from blamoscience
  12. blamoscience posted this