11th September, 2014

rhamphotheca:

Fishing Spiders (genus Dolomedes)
Spiders in the genus Dolomedes are often called dock spiders or fishing spiders. Nearly all species are semi-aquatic. Like water-striders, dock spiders are able to use the surface tension of water to speed across it. They are also capable of “diving” by climbing below the surface along vegetation - small hairs covering their body trap air bubbles that allow them to breathe.
Most species hunt aquatic or semi-aquatic insects. The spiders typically wait at the water’s edge with a couple of feet on the water’s surface, using extra-sensitive hairs on their legs to feel for vibrations carried through the surface tension like a spider web; then they dash out and ambush they prey. 
Some of the largest species of dock spider (reaching up to 3 in/7.5 cm across, toe-tip to toe-tip) are actually capable of catching small fish. They use claws at the tips of their forelegs to hook their prey and hold them while injecting them with paralyzing venom. This is the Six-spotted Fishing Spider (Dolomedes triton), found across the United States and southern Canada.photo by Mary Keim on Flickr
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

rhamphotheca:

Fishing Spiders (genus Dolomedes)

Spiders in the genus Dolomedes are often called dock spiders or fishing spiders. Nearly all species are semi-aquatic. Like water-striders, dock spiders are able to use the surface tension of water to speed across it. They are also capable of “diving” by climbing below the surface along vegetation - small hairs covering their body trap air bubbles that allow them to breathe.

Most species hunt aquatic or semi-aquatic insects. The spiders typically wait at the water’s edge with a couple of feet on the water’s surface, using extra-sensitive hairs on their legs to feel for vibrations carried through the surface tension like a spider web; then they dash out and ambush they prey.

Some of the largest species of dock spider (reaching up to 3 in/7.5 cm across, toe-tip to toe-tip) are actually capable of catching small fish. They use claws at the tips of their forelegs to hook their prey and hold them while injecting them with paralyzing venom. This is the Six-spotted Fishing Spider (Dolomedes triton), found across the United States and southern Canada.

photo by Mary Keim on Flickr

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

(via fauna)

11th September, 2014

11th September, 2014

brains-and-bodies:

From Daily Anatomy



"Incredibly beautiful micrograph of blood clotting"



"This awesome picture is a coloured scanning electron micrograph of human red blood cells (erythrocytes, red) and platelets (thrombocyte, white) forming a blood clot. Clots are formed in response to cardiovascular disease or injuries to blood vessels. Platelets secrete chemicals that promote the accumulation of fibrin (not seen) and other blood components required for clot formation."
Magnification x7000, by Steve Gschmeissner

brains-and-bodies:

From Daily Anatomy

"Incredibly beautiful micrograph of blood clotting"
"This awesome picture is a coloured scanning electron micrograph of human red blood cells (erythrocytes, red) and platelets (thrombocyte, white) forming a blood clot. Clots are formed in response to cardiovascular disease or injuries to blood vessels. Platelets secrete chemicals that promote the accumulation of fibrin (not seen) and other blood components required for clot formation."

Magnification x7000, by Steve Gschmeissner

(via SoSanguineRN)

3rd September, 2014

currentsinbiology:

Beautiful and sad GIFs that show what’s happening to the ocean (TED,COM)
Scientist Sylvia Earle (TED Talk: My wish: Protect our oceans) has spent the past five decades exploring the seas. During that time, she’s witnessed a steep decline in ocean wildlife numbers — and a sharp incline in the number of ocean deadzones and oil drilling sites. An original documentary about Earle’s life and work premieres today on Netflix. Watch it here.
What happened to the coral reefs?
Between 1950 and 2014, half of the coral reefs across the oceans died.
What happened to tuna, sharks, and cod?
Between 1950 and 2014, Pacific Bluefin Tuna, sharks, and North Atlantic Cod were all almost fished to extinction. Between 5% and 10% remain.
The number of ocean deadzones then and now.
Ocean deadzones are spots in the sea where life no longer exists. They occur when massive fertilizer runoff (or other ocean crises) set in motion an oxygen-depriving chain of events leading to the death in one spot of fish, crabs and other sea creatures. In 1975, there was one documented deadzone. In 2014, there were 500+.
The number of oil drilling sites then and now.
Oil drilling in the Gulf Coast didn’t start and stop with the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil disaster. But the practice is younger than you might think. In 1947, there was just one oil drilling site. In 2014, there were more than 30,000. currentsinbiology:

Beautiful and sad GIFs that show what’s happening to the ocean (TED,COM)
Scientist Sylvia Earle (TED Talk: My wish: Protect our oceans) has spent the past five decades exploring the seas. During that time, she’s witnessed a steep decline in ocean wildlife numbers — and a sharp incline in the number of ocean deadzones and oil drilling sites. An original documentary about Earle’s life and work premieres today on Netflix. Watch it here.
What happened to the coral reefs?
Between 1950 and 2014, half of the coral reefs across the oceans died.
What happened to tuna, sharks, and cod?
Between 1950 and 2014, Pacific Bluefin Tuna, sharks, and North Atlantic Cod were all almost fished to extinction. Between 5% and 10% remain.
The number of ocean deadzones then and now.
Ocean deadzones are spots in the sea where life no longer exists. They occur when massive fertilizer runoff (or other ocean crises) set in motion an oxygen-depriving chain of events leading to the death in one spot of fish, crabs and other sea creatures. In 1975, there was one documented deadzone. In 2014, there were 500+.
The number of oil drilling sites then and now.
Oil drilling in the Gulf Coast didn’t start and stop with the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil disaster. But the practice is younger than you might think. In 1947, there was just one oil drilling site. In 2014, there were more than 30,000. currentsinbiology:

Beautiful and sad GIFs that show what’s happening to the ocean (TED,COM)
Scientist Sylvia Earle (TED Talk: My wish: Protect our oceans) has spent the past five decades exploring the seas. During that time, she’s witnessed a steep decline in ocean wildlife numbers — and a sharp incline in the number of ocean deadzones and oil drilling sites. An original documentary about Earle’s life and work premieres today on Netflix. Watch it here.
What happened to the coral reefs?
Between 1950 and 2014, half of the coral reefs across the oceans died.
What happened to tuna, sharks, and cod?
Between 1950 and 2014, Pacific Bluefin Tuna, sharks, and North Atlantic Cod were all almost fished to extinction. Between 5% and 10% remain.
The number of ocean deadzones then and now.
Ocean deadzones are spots in the sea where life no longer exists. They occur when massive fertilizer runoff (or other ocean crises) set in motion an oxygen-depriving chain of events leading to the death in one spot of fish, crabs and other sea creatures. In 1975, there was one documented deadzone. In 2014, there were 500+.
The number of oil drilling sites then and now.
Oil drilling in the Gulf Coast didn’t start and stop with the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil disaster. But the practice is younger than you might think. In 1947, there was just one oil drilling site. In 2014, there were more than 30,000. currentsinbiology:

Beautiful and sad GIFs that show what’s happening to the ocean (TED,COM)
Scientist Sylvia Earle (TED Talk: My wish: Protect our oceans) has spent the past five decades exploring the seas. During that time, she’s witnessed a steep decline in ocean wildlife numbers — and a sharp incline in the number of ocean deadzones and oil drilling sites. An original documentary about Earle’s life and work premieres today on Netflix. Watch it here.
What happened to the coral reefs?
Between 1950 and 2014, half of the coral reefs across the oceans died.
What happened to tuna, sharks, and cod?
Between 1950 and 2014, Pacific Bluefin Tuna, sharks, and North Atlantic Cod were all almost fished to extinction. Between 5% and 10% remain.
The number of ocean deadzones then and now.
Ocean deadzones are spots in the sea where life no longer exists. They occur when massive fertilizer runoff (or other ocean crises) set in motion an oxygen-depriving chain of events leading to the death in one spot of fish, crabs and other sea creatures. In 1975, there was one documented deadzone. In 2014, there were 500+.
The number of oil drilling sites then and now.
Oil drilling in the Gulf Coast didn’t start and stop with the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil disaster. But the practice is younger than you might think. In 1947, there was just one oil drilling site. In 2014, there were more than 30,000.

currentsinbiology:

Beautiful and sad GIFs that show what’s happening to the ocean (TED,COM)

Scientist Sylvia Earle (TED Talk: My wish: Protect our oceans) has spent the past five decades exploring the seas. During that time, she’s witnessed a steep decline in ocean wildlife numbers — and a sharp incline in the number of ocean deadzones and oil drilling sites. An original documentary about Earle’s life and work premieres today on Netflix. Watch it here.

What happened to the coral reefs?

Between 1950 and 2014, half of the coral reefs across the oceans died.

What happened to tuna, sharks, and cod?

Between 1950 and 2014, Pacific Bluefin Tuna, sharks, and North Atlantic Cod were all almost fished to extinction. Between 5% and 10% remain.

The number of ocean deadzones then and now.

Ocean deadzones are spots in the sea where life no longer exists. They occur when massive fertilizer runoff (or other ocean crises) set in motion an oxygen-depriving chain of events leading to the death in one spot of fish, crabs and other sea creatures. In 1975, there was one documented deadzone. In 2014, there were 500+.

The number of oil drilling sites then and now.

Oil drilling in the Gulf Coast didn’t start and stop with the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil disaster. But the practice is younger than you might think. In 1947, there was just one oil drilling site. In 2014, there were more than 30,000.

(via Speculative Evolution)

2nd September, 2014

mapsontheweb:

Map of Titan, the largest moon of Saturn
The global VIMS map of Titan’s surface displayed here as a false-color composite using the VIMS channels at 4.8–5.2 μm as red, at 2 μm as green, and 1.27 μm as blue including Titan’s recent nomenclature (from Stephan et al., 2009). The map is displayed in a simple cylindrical projection centered at 0°N and 180°W.

mapsontheweb:

Map of Titan, the largest moon of Saturn

The global VIMS map of Titan’s surface displayed here as a false-color composite using the VIMS channels at 4.8–5.2 μm as red, at 2 μm as green, and 1.27 μm as blue including Titan’s recent nomenclature (from Stephan et al., 2009). The map is displayed in a simple cylindrical projection centered at 0°N and 180°W.

(Source: europlanet.dlr.de)

(via spaghettification or nah?)

18th August, 2014

orbiculator:

thelovelyseas:

Coral reef in Komodo National Park in Komodo, Indonesia. The reefs in Komodo are among the richest in the world and home to over 1,000 types of fish, nearly 400 varieties of coral, 70 kinds of sponges and several types of whales, sharks, turtles and dolphins by Michael Patrick O’Neill

ETA: those are the densest local feather star populations I’ve ever seen!— okay, maybe not the densest I’ve ever seen in photos, but still remarkable. orbiculator:

thelovelyseas:

Coral reef in Komodo National Park in Komodo, Indonesia. The reefs in Komodo are among the richest in the world and home to over 1,000 types of fish, nearly 400 varieties of coral, 70 kinds of sponges and several types of whales, sharks, turtles and dolphins by Michael Patrick O’Neill

ETA: those are the densest local feather star populations I’ve ever seen!— okay, maybe not the densest I’ve ever seen in photos, but still remarkable. orbiculator:

thelovelyseas:

Coral reef in Komodo National Park in Komodo, Indonesia. The reefs in Komodo are among the richest in the world and home to over 1,000 types of fish, nearly 400 varieties of coral, 70 kinds of sponges and several types of whales, sharks, turtles and dolphins by Michael Patrick O’Neill

ETA: those are the densest local feather star populations I’ve ever seen!— okay, maybe not the densest I’ve ever seen in photos, but still remarkable.

orbiculator:

thelovelyseas:

Coral reef in Komodo National Park in Komodo, Indonesia. The reefs in Komodo are among the richest in the world and home to over 1,000 types of fish, nearly 400 varieties of coral, 70 kinds of sponges and several types of whales, sharks, turtles and dolphins by Michael Patrick O’Neill

ETA: those are the densest local feather star populations I’ve ever seen!
— okay, maybe not the densest I’ve ever seen in photos, but still remarkable.

(via Kosmoceras)