sagansense
sagansense:


"I would also say that natural laws haven’t changed," CEO of the Creation Museum, Ken Ham says. "As I talked about, we have the laws of logic, the uniformity of nature — and that only makes sense within a biblical worldview anyway."
And that´s when you realize it isn’t a debate. 

via little-a-watson

Who else watched the debate? What did you guys think?

sagansense:

"I would also say that natural laws haven’t changed," CEO of the Creation Museum, Ken Ham says. "As I talked about, we have the laws of logic, the uniformity of nature — and that only makes sense within a biblical worldview anyway."

And that´s when you realize it isn’t a debate. 

via little-a-watson

Who else watched the debate? What did you guys think?

A bitter feud between Edward Drinker Cope and Othniel Charles Marsh in the late 19th century truly built paleontology into the field it was today. It’s not clear what the starting point for their bitter rivalry was, but it only grew in intensity over the years. 
The two men were notorious for stealing fossils from each other’s dig sites by bribing workers, as well as destroying bones and writing scathing criticisms on each others published work in newspapers in an attempt to discredit one another.  These actions, among others, led to both suffering blows to their finances as well as their reputation in the field. 
Their obsessive battle for supremacy, however, led to the discovery of rich bone beds in the western United States. It also resulted in an increased interest in prehistoric life (both in the public forum and academia), leading to an increase in fossil hunting in the decades to come. 
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A bitter feud between Edward Drinker Cope and Othniel Charles Marsh in the late 19th century truly built paleontology into the field it was today. It’s not clear what the starting point for their bitter rivalry was, but it only grew in intensity over the years. 

The two men were notorious for stealing fossils from each other’s dig sites by bribing workers, as well as destroying bones and writing scathing criticisms on each others published work in newspapers in an attempt to discredit one another.  These actions, among others, led to both suffering blows to their finances as well as their reputation in the field. 

Their obsessive battle for supremacy, however, led to the discovery of rich bone beds in the western United States. It also resulted in an increased interest in prehistoric life (both in the public forum and academia), leading to an increase in fossil hunting in the decades to come. 

Read more

When Stegosaurus was first discovered in 1877, experts weren’t used to the idea of elephant-sized lizards with bird-sized brains. That’s why, in the late 19th century, the famous paleontologist Othniel C. Marsh broached the idea that a second brain resided in Stegosaurus’ rump, which presumably helped to control the rear part of its body. Today, no one believes that Stegosaurus (or any dinosaur) had two brains, but it may well turn out that the cavity in this stegosaur's tail was used to store extra food (in the form of glycogen).
 

When Stegosaurus was first discovered in 1877, experts weren’t used to the idea of elephant-sized lizards with bird-sized brains. That’s why, in the late 19th century, the famous paleontologist Othniel C. Marsh broached the idea that a second brain resided in Stegosaurus’ rump, which presumably helped to control the rear part of its body. Today, no one believes that Stegosaurus (or any dinosaur) had two brains, but it may well turn out that the cavity in this stegosaur's tail was used to store extra food (in the form of glycogen).

 

Prehistoric Colors Preserved in Near-Perfect Beetle Fossils

Despite being tens of millions of years old, some beetle fossils appear almost as they did in life. Not only are their shape and structure preserved, but so are the actual colors of their shells, which have changed only slightly in the intervening eons.

Though relatively little-known, these fossils represent the purest of biological colors retrieved from deep time, far richer than much-celebrated pigment traces of dinosaur plumage and more varied than the hues of a few ancient plants.

In a study published Sept. 27 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, researchers led by Yale University paleogeologist Maria McNamara analyzed 10 of these spectacular beetle fossils, ranging from 15 million to 47 million years old, which owe their enduring shades to the phenomenon of structural coloration. Unlike pigments, which generate color from light bouncing off a chemical, structural colors are produced by the interaction of light with nanometer-scale surface geometries.

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A Brief Introduction

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Paleontology is the scientific study of prehistoric life. It includes the study of fossils to determine organisms’ evolution and interactions with each other and their environments (their paleoecology). Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as the 5th century BC. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier’s work on comparative anatomy, and developed rapidly in the 19th century. 

Paleontology lies on the border between biology and geology, but differs from archaeology in that it excludes the study of morphologically modern humans. It now uses techniques drawn from a wide range of sciences, including biochemistry, mathematicsand engineering. Use of all these techniques has enabled paleontologists to discover much of the evolutionary history of life, almost all the way back to when Earth became capable of supporting life, about 3,800 million years ago. As knowledge has increased, paleontology has developed specialized sub-divisions, some of which focus on different types of fossil organisms while others studyecology and environmental history, such as ancient climates.

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visualizingmath:

A toppling domino can push over a larger domino, but how much bigger must the next one be?

The Small Knocking Down the Big is a 2009 installation by Chinese artist Qiu Zhijie made from hundreds of cut wooden dominoes meant to loosely demonstrate the effects of something that has become known as Domino Magnification. The basic premise is that any domino can knock over another domino that’s roughly 1.5 times larger, meaning that if you gently pushed a normal sized domino into a chain of bricks that increase in size each time by 1.5, the 32nd object will be large enough to topple the Empire State Building! Source.

An insight into the mathematics and the physics behind Domino Magnification can be found in this cool article.